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Steve Katz (of Blood, Sweat, & Tears)

Steve Katz’s professional career started in the late fifties on a local Schenectady, New York television program called Teenage Barn. Accompanied by piano, Steve would sing such hits of the day  as “Tammy” and “April Love”. At 15, Steve studied guitar with Dave Van Ronk and Reverend Gary Davis. It was at this time that he met and befriended guitarist Stefan Grossman. Steve & Stefan would sometimes act as road managers for Reverend Davis and, in so doing, met many of the great “rediscovered” blues men of an earlier era, like Son House, Skip James and Mississippi John Hurt.

There were many other young musicians and potential college dropouts around Greenwich Village during this time who were as obsessed with American roots music as Steve, whether it be bluegrass or blues. Many would look for a common ground in which to play music together and some, including Steve, Stefan, Maria Muldaur, John Sebastian and David Grisman found the common denominator in jug band music – the music of Cannon’s Jug Stompers and The Memphis Jug Band. They and some other friends formed the Even Dozen Jug Band and were courted by Elektra Records for whom they recorded an album in 1964. Dwarfed by some of the finest young guitarists of the time, Steve opted to play washboard in the band. He would later use the same tactic of avoiding tough chords by mastering the harmonica.

After a brief sabbatical from college, Steve, while teaching guitar in Greenwich Village, was asked to audition for the Danny Kalb Quartet as a two-week substitute for the vacationing Artie Traum. Frightened by the power of the sound of an electric guitar and amp, Steve turned his volume to zero, thereby making no discernible mistakes. He got the job. Artie never came back, Al Kooper joined, and they had the Blues Project, a foray of young white middle-class musicians into the amplified world of Chicago blues. But they worked out of New York, and it was the mid-sixties, so the Blues Project experimented, dabbled in their own style and gave Steve an opportunity to showcase his own songs, as did Al and Danny. The Blues Project recorded three albums while together in their first incarnation. “Steve’s Song”, on the Projections album was the first original song that Steve had recorded.

The Blues Project, after two glorious years as house band at the Cafe Au Go Go and Murray the K’s last “submarine race-watching” spectacular at the the RKO 58th Street theater in New York, decided to break up, playing the Monterey Pop Festival as their last major gig. The Blues Project’s lasting contribution during its short life was to open the airwaves of radio to more album-oriented Rock. All attempts at singles failed but, like the consciousness of the era, people looked for alternatives in fashion, politics, lifestyles and musical tastes. The Blues Project gave people an alternative and, at the same time, made people aware of music that they might never have otherwise heard.

After the demise of the Blues Project, Steve, Al Kooper, Bobby Colomby and Jim Fielder decided to work up a set, mainly of Al’s new songs, for a benefit concert whereby enough money would be raised to send Al to London where he wanted to live. Joined by Fred Lipsius on alto sax, the concert raised enough money for Al to get a cab to the airport. There was no choice but to start another band. Influenced by the Electric Flag and an album by the Buckinghams entitled Time and Charges, a horn section was utilized with rock arrangements that were a touch more sophisticated than most horn arrangements in rock up to that time. Thus, the formation of Blood, Sweat & Tears, a Columbia Records contract, and the album Child is Father to the Man. Recorded and mixed in only two weeks, the album sold moderately well but was a huge critical success. Steve sang one original song (“Megan’s Gypsy Eyes”) and a song by his friend, the late Tim Buckley.

Al left Blood, Sweat & Tears after only six months and while they were reorganizing, Steve wrote record reviews for Eye Magazine, a Cosmopolitan spin-off. Getting the record company to continue with the band without Kooper was difficult. Auditions were held and David Clayton-Thomas was hired as lead singer. Columbia reluctantly agreed to go ahead with a new album. That album sold six million copies worldwide and fostered three number one singles, a major feat for 1969. Steve continued with Blood, Sweat & Tears for six years, during which time the group received a large number of accolades. They won three Grammies, were voted best band by the Playboy Jazz and Pop Poll two years in a row, and won three major Downbeat awards, to name a few. Steve wrote many songs during his tenure with BS&T, including his well-loved “Sometimes in Winter”.

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$15 adv. - $20 at the door | 7pm doors - 8pm show

Covid-19 Protocols:

We are very excited to be hosting live music shows again in our listening room. OLS is committed to providing a safe environment for all who work, listen, or perform live music in our venue. Because our venue is so small, we will require all staff, volunteers, performers, and patrons to show proof of full vaccination against COVID-19 when they attend OLS events AND to wear masks indoors unless they are actively drinking, eating, or performing.

Proof of vaccine must come directly from the health care provider that performed the vaccination and can be a photo or physical copy of the vaccination card or record with an accompanying photo ID. Full vaccination means that the date of the performance you are attending is:

* at least 14 days after your second dose of an FDA or WHO authorized two dose COVID-19 vaccine, or

* at least 14 days after your single dose of an FDA or WHO authorized single dose COVID vaccine.

We hope we can ease these restrictions once further progress has been made reducing transmission of the virus. Until then we greatly appreciate your patience and cooperation.

One Longfellow Square does not assume liability; the ticket holder will assume all risks involved. By purchasing a ticket to this event you agree to assume full liability for any risks incurred before, during and after the event and agree to the current Terms of Use.